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Wireless charging trial shows potential for EV use

The project, which was part funded by the Flemish government, brought together a consortium including Volvo Car Group, Bombardier Transportation, coachbuilder Van Hool and the Flanders’ Drive automotive knowledge centre to test the potential of inductive charging for electric vehicles.

Instead of using a cable, inductive charging transmits energy from a base station to a receiver in the car, avoiding the need to physically plug the vehicle in. As the process begins automatically, Volvo Car Group believes the the technology could be vital for improving the practicality of electric vehicles.

Inductive charging is already familiar in household goods, particularly electric toothbrushes, but as yet it isn’t factory-fitted to any electric vehicles.

Lennart Stegland, Vice President, Electric Propulsion System at Volvo Car Group, said: ‘Inductive charging has great potential. Cordless technology is a comfortable and effective way to conveniently transfer energy. The study also indicates that it is safe.

‘There is not yet any common standard for inductive charging. We will continue our research and evaluate the feasibility of the technology in our hybrid and electric car projects.’

 

Alex Grant

Trained on Cardiff University’s renowned Postgraduate Diploma in Motor Magazine Journalism, Alex is an award-winning motoring journalist with ten years’ experience across B2B and consumer titles. A life-long car enthusiast with a fascination for new technology and future drivetrains, he joined Fleet World in April 2011, contributing across the magazine and website portfolio and editing the EV Fleet World Website.

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