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EV charging cables becoming must-have items for scrap metal thieves

By / 5 months ago / UK News / No Comments

Electric vehicle drivers are being advised to lock away charging cables as the metal in them becomes increasingly sought after by thieves.

EV cables have become must-have items for scrap metal thieves, according to Divert.co.uk

According to rubbish removal company Divert.co.uk, EV cables have become must-have items for scrap metal thieves.

“Car chargers are particularly appealing to thieves because they can be sold for up to £200 and they are selling them everywhere, eBay, Facebook, and to dodgy scrap dealers,” says company spokesman Mark Hall. “And they can be pretty costly and inconvenient for you to replace, so it’s best to keep it locked away from the crooks.”

Although many electric vehicles have systems in place that lock the charger into position, allowing the owners to leave the car charging securely overnight or while they are shopping, these security measures aren’t always fool-proof and can be impacted by things like cold weather.

Divert.co.uk said the simplest solution is to padlock the cable to your vehicle while charging it at home or out and about, similarly to how you would secure a bike with a bike lock.

Drivers should also charge inside a garage where possible or park with the charging point nearest to the house, in order to keep the cable discreet to potential thieves driving by.

When not in use, the cable should be locked away or hidden out of sight.

Hall continued: “Most charging cables available for public use are tethered to try and prevent people from making off with them, and you can purchase similar devices to be used at home.

“Because if it’s not bolted down or locked away – someone will try to pinch it.”

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Natalie Middleton

Natalie has worked as a fleet journalist for nearly 20 years, previously as assistant editor on the former Company Car magazine before joining Fleet World in 2006. Prior to this, she worked on a range of B2B titles, including Insurance Age and Insurance Day. Natalie edits all the Fleet World websites and newsletters, and loves to hear about any latest industry news - or gossip.