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Toyota drops diesel for core fleet models

By / 2 weeks ago / New Cars / No Comments

Toyota has shown full hybrid versions of the Corolla, Camry and RAV4 at the Paris Motor Show, each offering lower CO2 emissions than the diesel models they replace.

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The Corolla, which replaces the Auris in Europe, will be offered with two hybrid systems in both hatchback and estate bodystyles; one using a 1.8-litre petrol engine, and the other addressing customer criticism of the outgoing car’s lethargic performance by switching to a 2.0-litre petrol engine.

Toyota has confirmed fuel consumption of 83.1mpg and CO2 emissions of 76g/km for the low-powered hybrid, or 74.3mpg and with 86g/km CO2 emissions for the new higher-power system. Both are WLTP-derived ‘NEDC Correlated’ figures – full WLTP data has not been released yet.

In the RAV4, 90% of customers are expected to opt for the hybrid, which is available in two guises both based on a 2.5-litre petrol engine. The two-wheel drive version produces 215bhp, while the four-wheel drive version adds an electric motor at the rear axle and produces 219bhp. In the latter, up to 80% of the torque can now be put to the rear axle when traction is limited.

Again, NEDC Correlated fuel economy data puts the RAV4 Hybrid in contention with diesel SUVs; 62.8mpg and 102g/km for two-wheel drive, or 61.4mpg and 105g/km for four-wheel drive.

Finally, the Camry returns to Europe after a 14-year absence, and will replace the Avensis. This marks the eighth full hybrid in Toyota’s UK line-up; a 2.5-litre petrol-electric setup producing 215bhp, with a continuously-variable transmission offering six stepped ‘gear shifts’. Fuel economy of up to 67.3mpg, with CO2 emissions of 98g/km, place it amongst the most efficient cars in its class, though this is based on NEDC Correlated data.

None of the above models will be available with diesel engines; in the UK, 45% of Toyota’s 101,000 sales were hybrids last year, compared to around 7% which were diesel-powered.

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Alex Grant

Trained on Cardiff University’s renowned Postgraduate Diploma in Motor Magazine Journalism, Alex is an award-winning motoring journalist with ten years’ experience across B2B and consumer titles. A life-long car enthusiast with a fascination for new technology and future drivetrains, he joined Fleet World in April 2011, contributing across the magazine and website portfolio and editing the EV Fleet World Website.